H.M.S Chanticleer

HMS Chanticleer

I recived a few new photos from a webuser with Reference to Sidney Jones, Able Seaman. He was also Killed in Action on the 18th November 1943. Please have a look at my main site where you will find more information, again if you have any photos from old relatives with reference to H.M.S Chanticleer please get in touch.

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http://www.canvins.com/ofintrest/hmschanticleer.html

Ouzel Valley Park October 2020

A 7.5 mile walk around the lakes and canal in Milton Keynes. The weather was not great but we managed it rain free the whole route. The colours of autumn looked nice on the trees. It was all on easy paths a little muddy on the canal towpath but a good walk this one. The river you follow is the river Ouzel and this flows past Caldecotte lake  you will find a large weir and on the day we visited a huge amount of water was flowing over it. 

Viewranger mapping info

Pleasew Scan the image above or click this link to view mapping.

Ivinghoe Beacon Walk September 2020

We took penny and roger for a hike around ivinghoe beacon a 9 mile walk. The weather was not great but at least the rain held off we did manage a nice pint at the Valiant trooper pub. Ive done this walk a hundred times but is always great this time of year, the autumn colours always look good. A nice easy route along good paths, can be a little muddy but nothing dreadful.

Mapping with Viewranger

https://my.viewranger.com/route/details/MzQ5ODM5Ng==

Please Scan or click the above image to view route.

Carlisle 7th September 2020

Carlisle Cathedral

Gail says we have visited this city before but I cannot remember one bit of it. We arrived after a hours drive from Rowrah and parked up for a visit. It’s a lovely old city with a castle and cathedral that we visited inside, the weather was not up much but on a nice day it looks like a great place to visit.

From Wikipedia. Carlisle (/kɑːrˈlaɪl/ kar-LYLElocally /ˈkɑːrlaɪl/ KAR-lyle;[1] from CumbricCaer Luel;[2][3] Scottish GaelicCathair Luail[4]) is a border[5][6] city and the county town of Cumbria as well as the administrative centre of the City of Carlisle district in North West England. Carlisle is located at the confluence of the rivers EdenCaldew and Petteril, 10 miles (16 km) south of the Scottish border.[7] Originally in the historic county of Cumberland, it is now the largest settlement in the county of Cumbria, and serves as the administrative centre for both Carlisle City Council and Cumbria County Council. At the time of the 2001 census, the population of Carlisle was 71,773, with 100,734 living in the wider city. Ten years later, at the 2011 census, the city’s population had risen to 75,306, with 107,524 in the wider city.[8]

Helvellyn September 2020

A great walk to the top of Helvellyn in cumbria in bad weather. Helvellyn stands at 3118ft and there are many routes to the top some hard and some rather easier. To the West of Helvellyn you find Thirlmere and and with the A591 right by it you will find a couple of large car parks we parked in the one called Wythburn . From the Car park just head East uphill, its hard going for the first mile but it levels off a bit there after however it is nothing challenging just watch your footsteps in bad weather. The views were great to start with then the cloud come down and spoilt everything I’m afraid we could not even see Striding Edge. A great walk but best enjoyed in better weather. PLease view our Viewranger Link.

Please Scan the QR code to goto Viewranger to see route

Ennerdale Water

Ennerdale Water

It’s grim up north !  Well due to the weather not being great we set off on a low walk around lovely ennerdale water. It’s a walk we have done many times I also have run it many times but this time we completely went over anglers cragg. Well it was a bad move as we have never seen rain like it in all our travels up there it threw it down and we got completely soaked to the skin, but we shall probably do it all again one day !  

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Packwood house a national trust home.

Packwood House

A lot of the National Trust properties are shut down due to the ongoing pandemic so you currently have to book a times ticket to gain entry. This list was to Packwood house that lies on the county of Warwickshire. The house dates from 1550 and has substantial gardens that you could freely walk around, just nice to finally get out and about . 

From Wikipedia

The house began as a modest timber-framed farmhouse constructed for John Fetherston between 1556 and 1560. The last member of the Fetherston family died in 1876.[3] In 1904 the house was purchased by Birmingham industrialist Alfred Ash.[4]It was inherited by Graham Baron Ash (Baron in this case being a name not a title) in 1925,[3] who spent the following two decades creating a house of Tudor character. He purchased an extensive collection of 16th- and 17th-century furniture, some obtained from nearby Baddesley Clinton. The great barn of the farm was converted into a Tudor-style hall with sprung floor for dancing, and was connected to the main house by the addition of a Long Gallery in 1931.[5]

In 1941, Ash donated the house and gardens to the National Trust in memory of his parents but continued to live in the house until 1947 when he moved to Wingfield Castle.[6]

Hatton Locks 15th August 2020

Hatton Locks

Well after the year gone due to the pandemic we finally got out and visited Warwickshire to visit the 21 locks on the grand union canal at the village of Hatton. The weather was fantastic so we had a walk from top to bottom and it surprised me, the incline was huge and it must of took ages to get from top to bottom.

he flight was opened in December 1799 on the Warwick and Birmingham Canal. In 1929, the canal was renamed as the Grand Union Canal (on unification of a number of operators) and the decision was made to widen the Hatton stretch. In order to accommodate traders with heavy cargos of coal, sugar, tea and spices up the flight, the locks were widened to 14 feet (4.3 m) – allowing navigation by industrial boats or two single narrowboats.[1] The widening was completed in the mid-1930s using a workforce of 1,000, and the revolutionary concrete lock system was opened by Prince George, Duke of Kent.[1]

The flight was known as the “stairway to heaven” due to the difficulty of the flight and the subsequent easier journey to Camp Hill where the workmen would receive their wages.[1]

Bournemouth & Poole 29th Feb 2020

We had a trip to the coast for a couple of days and stayed in a nice Hotel and close to the sea.  Weather was not brilliant but that did not stop us going out and enjoying ourselves. We had a lovely tea in a tea shop paid for by James and jade for a Xmas present. A nice trip was had and Bournemouth is worth a visit plenty to sea and some nice bars and restaurants.   

Bournemouth. from Wikipedia

Bournemouth /ˈbɔːrnməθ/ (listen) is a coastal resort town on the south coast of England. At the 2011 census, the town had a population of 183,491, making it the largest in the administrative county of Dorset. With Poole to the west and Christchurch in the east, Bournemouth is part of the South East Dorset conurbation, which has a population of 465,000.

Before it was founded in 1810 by Lewis Tregonwell, the area was a deserted heathland occasionally visited by fishermen and smugglers. Initially marketed as a health resort, the town received a boost when it appeared in Augustus Granville‘s 1841 book, The Spas of England. Bournemouth’s growth accelerated with the arrival of the railway, and it became a town in 1870. Part of the historic county of Hampshire, Bournemouth joined Dorset for administrative purposes following the reorganisation of local government in 1974. Through local government changes in 1997, the town began to be administered by a unitary authority independent of Dorset County Council, although it remains part of that ceremonial county. Since April 2019 the unitary authority has been merged with that of Poole, as well as the non-metropolitan district of Christchurch to create the Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole unitary authority.