Cholsey to Tilehurst a 13 mile Thames walk.

We decided to do this walk on the hottest day of the year I think about 28 deg of heat and very little shade on the walk. Transport links are easy for this walk as the GWR railway branch line runs from Cholsey and Tilehurst and cost about £10 for 2 people one way. From Tilehurst station you take a right and head towards the bridge over the rail line by the Roebuck public house, as soon as you come to the Thames head left towards Cholsey. The walk is flat with just a couple of small climbs along the way, the paths are well kept and you have to cross over the Thames a couple of times to keep to the path. Some lovely villages and towns are on route and you will visit Goring and Whitchurch on Thames. You can soon come off the path to visit these towns if you wish and you will find some nice pubs also if you fancy a pint. The walk was a long one and the heat was extreme but it was enjoyable with Some great scenery . Please check out the GPS file of ViewRanger to help you plan this one.

Cholsey is a village and large civil parish two miles (3 km) south of Wallingford, in South Oxfordshire. In 1974 it was transferred from Berkshire to the county of Oxfordshire, and from Wallingford Rural District to the district of South Oxfordshire. Cholsey’s parish boundaries, some 17 miles (27 km) long, reach from the edge of Wallingford into the Berkshire Downs. The village green is known as The Forty and has a substantial and ancient walnut tree. Winterbrook was historically at the north end of the parish adjoining Wallingford and became within Wallingford parish (run by its Town Council) since 2015. It is the site of Winterbrook Bridge, which carries a by-pass road across the Thames, and was one of the two main residences of the late author Dame Agatha Christie (the other being the village of Galmpton on the south Devon coast). John Masefield, poet laureate, was a resident of Cholsey.

Mapping:

Please goto Viewranger here , or Garmin Connect here. 

 

 

Henley-on-Thames to Tilehurst along the Thames Path.

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Another of our long walks along the River thames this time starting in Henley-on-Thames and finishing in the Town of Tilehurst a total distance of about 12.5 miles.

Mapping (sorry cant get it to Embed with WordPress)

https://my.viewranger.com/track/widget/6822509?locale=en&m=miles&v=2

Once at Tilehurst Station you will find the River Thames just over the Barrier however you cannot get down from the Station platform, just head onto the road and head North west along Oxford Road until you find the Roebuck Hotel and the bridge leading down to the path. You will pass some great real estate along the banks of the thames as you approach the City of reading, as soon you will find yourself at Redgrave Pinsent Rowing lake names after he Olympic rowers Sir Steve Redgrave and Sir Matthew Pinsent. The lake and its boathouse are specifically designed for training use, and provide training, medical, and scientific facities for the GB rowing squad, and for Oxford University in preparation for the Boat Race.

You will find many locks along the path including Sonning lock and Caversham Lock. You will also see along the route Caversham bridge that opened in 1926. 

A great but long walk this one but the ground is flat and easy with loads to see on route. Watch out because after rain some of the path can become a bit boggy under foot so take good walking boots. There are plenty of pubs along the route if you fancy a beer whilst out.

Transport Links:

We first made our way to Henley on Thames train station operated by Great Western Train services. The Car park has plenty of spaces so we parked here easily and on a Saturday it will cost you £5 for all day. To get toTilehurst just take the train to Twyford then change to Tilehurst it cost about £13 for 2 single tickets and took about 35mins in total.

 

 

Bourne end to Henley-on-Thames

This is walk number 9 along the Thames river please goto our Thames webpage to view the other walks. Please click this link to view page. 

Another Riverside walk along the Thames and a step further to finishing this long distance Thames path. This section was about 12 miles long and although the ground was flat and good it still makes for a full days walking. The best way to get to Henley-Upon-Thames the start of the walk is from Bourne End train station, simply park the car there and catch a train to Marlow. From Marlow we got a bus and this dropped us off in the centre of Henley and the start of the walk allow about 1hr to get to Henley and about 5 hours spare for the walk. Take a picnic with you as there are some nice spots along the river with plenty of benches to sit on

Henley-Upon-Thames

Henley-on-Thames

Its a shame we never had a good look around the Historic Market Town however we had a lot of Miles to do. Henley-on-Thames /ˈhɛnliː ɒn ˈtɛmz/ is a historic market town and civil parish on the River Thames in Oxfordshire, England, 9 miles (14 km) northeast of Reading, 7 miles (11 km) west of Maidenhead and 23 miles (37 km) southeast of Oxford. One of its boundaries has the tripoint of Oxfordshire, Berkshire and Buckinghamshire. The 2011 Census recorded the parish population as 11,619.


Temple island

Temple island

As you make your way along the Thames you will soon past the Folly on Temple Island. Temple Island is an island in the River Thames in England just north (downstream) of Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire. The island is on the reach above Hambleden Lock between the Buckinghamshire and Berkshire banks, and is part of Remenham in Berkshire. The main significance of the island is that it lies at the start of the course for Henley Royal Regatta.


Hambleden locks and mill

Hambleden lock & mill

Hambleden Lock is a lock with a long weir situated on the River Thames in England. The lock is on the Berkshire bank between Aston and Remenham. It was built by the Thames Navigation Commission in 1773, The lock is named after the village of Hambleden, a mile (1.5 km) to the north.

The great weir is impressive and there are walkways over it from the lock to the small village of Mill End on the Buckinghamshire bank. Here is situated the picturesque Hambleden Mill, and the site of a Roman villa is nearby. Hambleden Mill is a historic watermill on the River Thames at Mill End, near the village of Hambleden in Buckinghamshire, England. It is next to Hambleden Lock and has now been converted into flats. It was Grade II listed in 1955.

The Mill was mentioned in the Domesday Book when it had a rent of £1/year. Before 1235 the mill was granted to Keynsham Abbey. Alison Uttley described it as “The most beautiful place in the whole length of the long Thames valley.”[1]’

You will also visit the town of Marlow and a few other villages on route just have a look at the map I have attached to the website for easy planning.

Mapping using Viewranger.

http://my.viewranger.com/route/widget/MTU0MTQ3Mg==?locale=en&m=miles